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Author(s): Elizabeth Matthews, Jamie Bechtel, Easkey Britton, Karl Morrison, Caleb McClennen
Year: 2012
Description/Abstract: Women and men play different roles in fishing communities around the world, however in all communities the failure to engage women in management efforts results in lost opportunities to improve conservation practices and ensure secure, viable livelihoods. WCS has identified a portfolio of opportunities around the world where understanding gender dynamics more broadly and engaging women specifically can provide positive and long-lasting environmental change and improve coastal and fisheries management efforts. We have leveraged our global network of sites to identify a broad and relevant set of core gender-related strategies and recommend the best solutions, for both WCS and the wider conservation and fisheries community. This report summarizes the findings of WCS’s effort to provide a contextualized assessment of opportunities for improving the livelihoods of people involved in small-scale fisheries and marine conservation by focusing on the impacts of gender dynamics and women’s engagement.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Matthews, Elizabeth, Jamie Bechtel, Easkey Britton, Karl Morrison and Caleb McClennen (2012). A Gender Perspective on Securing Livelihoods and Nutrition in Fish-dependent Coastal Communities. Report to The Rockefeller Foundation from Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
Author(s): David Wilkie, Michelle Wieland and Diane Detoeuf
Year: 2015
Description/Abstract: French version also available.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society, USAID
Full Citation: Wilkie, D., Wieland, M. and Detoeuf, D. 2015. A guide to the modified Basic Necessities Survey: Why and how to conduct BNS in conservation landscapes. WCS, New York, USA
Author(s): Seimon, A., J. Watson, R. Dave, J. Oglethorpe and E. Gray
Year: 2011
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society and Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group
Full Citation: Seimon, A., J. Watson, R. Dave, J. Oglethorpe and E. Gray (2011): A Review of Climate Change Adaptation Initiatives within the Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group Members. Wildlife Conservation Society, New York, and Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group, Washington DC. 124 pp.
Author(s): Watson, J. E. M. and Segan, D.
Year: 2013
Journal/Source: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
Publisher: Cell Press
Full Citation: Watson, J. E. M. and Segan, D. (2013), Accommodating the human response for realistic adaptation planning: response to Gillson et al. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 28 (10): 573-574. doi: 10.1111/conl.12120.
Author(s): Seimon, A. and A. Plumptre
Year: 2012
Description/Abstract: Despite high human population density and extreme levels of poverty, Albertine Rift remains one of Africa’s most important conservation priorities. Incorporating what are likely to be major impacts of climate change into conservation in this landscape requires the development of basic information on transboundary cooperation relationships between climate and biodiversity and addressing short-term conservation needs as well as longer-term planning. Given uncertainties in how climate change will unfold in the Albertine Rift landscape, conservation priorities are focused on safeguarding high-elevation and mountainous habitats, and maintaining or reestablishing connectivity between those areas.
Publisher: Island Press
Full Citation: "Seimon, A. and A. Plumptre (2012). Albertine Rift, Africa. In J. A. Hilty, C. C. Chester and M. S. Cross (Eds.), Climate and Conservation: Landscape and Seascape Science, Planning, and Action (pp. 33-44). Island Press, Whastington, DC. doi: 10.5822/978-1-61091-203-7_3 "
Author(s): Rowland, E. L., J. E. Davison, and L. J. Graumlich
Year: 2011
Description/Abstract: Assessing the impact of climate change on species and associated management objectives is a critical initial step for engaging in the adaptation planning process. Multiple approaches are available. While all possess limitations to their application associated with the uncertainties inherent in the data and models that inform their results, conducting and incorporating impact assessments into the adaptation planning process at least provides some basis for making resource management decisions that are becoming inevitable in the face of rapidly changing climate. Here we provide a non-exhaustive review of long-standing (e.g., species distribution models) and newly developed (e.g., vulnerability indices) methods used to anticipate the response to climate change of individual species as a guide for managers grappling with how to begin the climate change adaptation process. We address the limitations (e.g., uncertainties in climate change projections) associated with these methods, and other considerations for matching appropriate assessment approaches with the management questions and goals. Thorough consideration of the objectives, scope, scale, time frame and available resources for a climate impact assessment allows for informed method selection. With many data sets and tools available on-line, the capacity to undertake and/or benefit from existing species impact assessments is accessible to those engaged in resource management. With some understanding of potential impacts, even if limited, adaptation planning begins to move toward the development of management strategies and targeted actions that may help to sustain functioning ecosystems and their associated services into the future.
Journal/Source: Environmental Management
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Full Citation: Rowland, E. L., J. E. Davison, and L. J. Graumlich. 2011. Approaches to evaluating climate change impacts on species: A guide to initiating the adaptation planning process. Environmental Management 47(3):322-337. doi: 10.1007/s00267-010-9608-x.
Author(s): Pacifici, Michela, Foden, Wendy B., Visconti, Piero, Watson, James E. M. , Butchart, Stuart H.M., Kovacs, Kit M., Scheffers, Brett R., Hole, David G., Martin, Tara G., Akcakaya, H. Resit, Corlett, Richard T., Huntley, Brian, Bickford, David, Carr, Jamie A., Hoffmann, Ary A., Midgley, Guy F., Pearce-Kelly, Paul, Pearson, Richard G., Williams, Stephen E., Willis, Stephen G., Young, Bruce, and Rondinini, Carlo
Year: 2015
Description/Abstract: The effects of climate change on biodiversity are increasingly well documented, and many methods have been developed to assess species' vulnerability to climatic changes, both ongoing and projected in the coming decades. To minimize global biodiversity losses, conservationists need to identify those species that are likely to be most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. In this Review, we summarize different currencies used for assessing species' climate change vulnerability. We describe three main approaches used to derive these currencies (correlative, mechanistic and trait-based), and their associated data requirements, spatial and temporal scales of application and modelling methods. We identify strengths and weaknesses of the approaches and highlight the sources of uncertainty inherent in each method that limit projection reliability. Finally, we provide guidance for conservation practitioners in selecting the most appropriate approach(es) for their planning needs and highlight priority areas for further assessments.
Journal/Source: Nature Climate Change
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Full Citation: Pacifici, Michela, Foden, Wendy B., Visconti, Piero, Watson, James E. M. , Butchart, Stuart H.M., Kovacs, Kit M., Scheffers, Brett R., Hole, David G., Martin, Tara G., Akcakaya, H. Resit, Corlett, Richard T., Huntley, Brian, Bickford, David, Carr, Jamie A., Hoffmann, Ary A., Midgley, Guy F., Pearce-Kelly, Paul, Pearson, Richard G., Williams, Stephen E., Willis, Stephen G., Young, Bruce, and Rondinini, Carlo(2014). “Assessing species vulnerability to climate change.” Nature Climate Change 5(3): 215–224. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2448
Author(s): Evelio Arambiza, Michael Painter
Year: 2006
Description/Abstract: The appropriate relationship between efforts to conserve biological diversity and promote development initiatives that contribute to improving the quality of life of indigenous people has proven contentious, and discussions often seemed more oriented toward staking out positions than defining areas of shared interest upon which alliances that could shape rural land use might be constructed. The Capitanía de Alto y Bajo Isoso, the indigenous organization representing the interests of the Guaraní people in the Isoso region of Bolivia’s Chaco, and the Wildlife Conservation Society, a US-based conservation organization, have developed a partnership over the course of more than 15 years, which has made important contributions to conserving biological diversity and supporting the initiatives of indigenous people to improve their quality of life. This article discusses what have been crucial elements in building and maintaining the partnership, and suggests lessons that might be applied in other settings
Journal/Source: Human Organization
Publisher: Society for Applied Anthropology
Full Citation: Arambiza, E. and M. Painter. 2006. Biodiversity conservation and the quality of life of indigenous people in the Bolivian Chaco. Human Organization 65(1): 20-34.
Author(s): Rao, M., S. Htun, S. G. Platt, R. Tizard, C. Poole, T. Myint and J. E. M. Watson
Year: 2013
Description/Abstract: High levels of species richness and endemism make Myanmar a regional priority for conservation. However, decades of economic and political sanctions have resulted in low conservation investment to effectively tackle threats to biodiversity. Recent sweeping political reforms have placed Myanmar on the fast track to economic development—the expectation is increased economic investments focused on the exploitation of the country’s rich, and relatively intact, natural resources. Within a context of weak regulatory capacity and inadequate environmental safeguards, rapid economic development is likely to have far-reaching negative implications for already threatened biodiversity and natural-resource-dependent human communities. Climate change will further exacerbate prevailing threats given Myanmar’s high exposure and vulnerability. The aim of this review is to examine the implications of increased economic growth and a changing climate within the larger context of biodiversity conservation in Myanmar. We summarize conservation challenges, assess direct climatological impacts on biodiversity and conclude with recommendations for long-term adaptation approaches for biodiversity conservation.
Journal/Source: AMBIO A Journal of the Human Environment
Publisher: Springer Netherlands
Full Citation: Rao, M., S. Htun, S. G. Platt, R. Tizard, C. Poole, T. Myint and J. E. M. Watson (2013). "Biodiversity conservation in a changing climate: A review of threats and implications for conservation planning in Myanmar." AMBIO A Journal of the Human Environment 42(7): 789-804. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13280-013-0423-5
Author(s): Tom Clements , Lucy Garrett , Ashish John , Omaliss Keo , Kongkim Sreng , Pech Bunnat , Rours Vann , Tan Setha , Thong Sokha , Hugo Rainey
Year: 2009
Description/Abstract: This case study describes a direct payment program that was established for nine Globally Threatened bird species in the Northern Plains of Cambodia, including five listed as Critically Endangered.
Publisher: TransLinks
Author(s): Meike S. Andersson , Sara J. Scherr , Seth Shames , Lucy Aliguma , Adriana Lucía Arcos D. , Byamukama Biryahwaho , Sandra Bolaños , James Cock , German Escobar , José Antonio Gómez , Florence Nagawa , Thomas Oberthür , Leif Pederson , Alastair Taylor
Year: 2009
Description/Abstract: This paper examines how bundling of ecosystem services into agricultural products (BESAP) markets are actually being set up on the ground, drawing lessons learned from six cases in Africa and Latin America.
Publisher: TransLinks
Author(s): David Wilkie et al.
Year: 2007
Publisher: TransLinks
Author(s): Oscar Castillo, Connie Clark, Peter Coppolillo, Heidi Kretser, Roan McNab, Andrew Noss, Helder Quieroz, Yemeserach Tessema, Amy Vedder, Robert Wallace, Joseph Walston, David Wilkie
Year: 2006
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Castillo, O., C. Clark,P. Coppolillo, H. Kretser, R. McNab, A. Noss, H. Queiroz, Y. Tessema, A.Vedder, J. Walston, and D. Wilkie. 2006. Casting for Conservation Actors: People, Partnerships and Wildlife. WCS Working Paper No. 28. New York: Wildlife Conservation Society.
Author(s): Christina Connolly , Joe Walston , Michel Masozera , Martin Hega , Malcolm Starkey
Year: 2009
Description/Abstract: This case study describes how WCS is working with the Government of Gabon on a new Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) initiative to secure long-term protection of the high conservation value of the Mbé watershed in Gabon. The project is exploring ways to remunerate these upstream land managers for maintaining their land-use practices to secure the continued provision of a year round supply of high quality water. More broadly, the project also aims to address key barriers to developing sustainable PES mechanisms in Gabon and is being designed to maximize lesson learning and replicability.
Publisher: TransLinks
Author(s): Hilty, J. A., C. C. Chester, and M. S. Cross
Year: 2012
Description/Abstract: Climate and Conservation presents case studies from around the world of leading-edge projects focused on climate change adaptation-regional-scale endeavors where scientists, managers, and practitioners are working to protect biodiversity by protecting landscapes and seascapes in response to threats posed by climate change.
Publisher: Island Press
Full Citation: Hilty, J. A., C. C. Chester, and M. S. Cross (editors). 2012. Climate and Conservation: Landscape and seascape science, planning and action. Island Press, Washington DC. doi: 10.5822/978-1-61091-203-7
Author(s): Cross, M. S., and C. Servheen
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: Summary of workshop held September 13-15, 2010 in Fernie, British Columbia, sponsored by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Servheen, C., and M. S. Cross. 2010. Climate change impacts on grizzly bears and wolverines in Northern US and Transboundary Rockies: Strategies for Conservation. Report on a workshop held September 13-15, 2010 in Fernie, British Columbia.
Author(s): Cross, M. S., and C. Servheen
Year: 2009
Description/Abstract: Summary of workshop held October 6-7, 2009, sponsored by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Servheen, C., and M. S. Cross. 2010. Climate change impacts on grizzly bears and wolverines in Northern US and Transboundary Rockies: Strategies for Conservation. Report on a workshop held September 13-15, 2010 in Fernie, British Columbia.
Author(s): Kingsford, R.T and J.E.M. Watson
Year: 2011
Description/Abstract: Climate change is already affecting many of the world's ecosystems with far-reaching impacts. In this special issue, contributors focus on the current and projected impacts of climate change across different geographical regions of Oceania (Australia, Pacific Islands and New Zealand). In this synthesis, we examine how climate change is affecting the three main realms: terrestrial, freshwater (broadly including estuarine and inland saline systems) and marine. Within this context, we also examine general strategies for climate adaptation including reducing other threats (e.g., habitat loss and degradation), expanding protected areas, increasing connectivity, restoring habitat and translocations. We show that many of these general strategies will not overcome all the threats caused by climate change and specific solutions are likely to be necessary. Beyond the implementation of these strategies, there are significant future challenges which will hamper effective adaptation that need to be overcome by the scientific community. Our current understanding of the impacts of climate change on biodiversity remains poor; this is particularly true for poor nations in the region. There is also considerable uncertainty in forecasts of climate change, particularly at the local scale, and this uncertainty impacts pro-active planning. This makes effective implementation particularly challenging. Considerable focus is needed into ecosystem-based adaptation where local communities are integrally involved, allied with more active and accountable management of conservation, through adaptive management processes. The world is experiencing far reaching and long-term changes to ecosystems with major impacts on human communities, particularly in relation to ecosystem services. Our ability to develop effective adaptation strategies from the broad scale policy (e.g., emissions control) to local scale management (e.g., building resilience in ecosystems) will be significantly tested but the world is in an important period and scientists and practitioners need to keep trying different approaches and reporting their successes and failures to the wider community.
Journal/Source: Pacific Conservation Biology
Publisher: Surrey Beatty & Sons
Full Citation: Kingsford, R.T and J.E.M. Watson (2011). Climate change in Oceania - a synthesis of biodiversity impacts and adaptations. Pacific Conservation Biology, 17(3): 270-284.
Author(s): Jenkins, J
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: This full-length book addresses the local implications of climate change, shifting the focus within this global issue to the tangible, the real, and the "solvable." Through text, illustrations, photographs, and diagrams, it tells the story of regional impacts already experienced and likely under climate change. In the second part, the book goes on to deliver a critical message: using existing techniques and technology, the Adirondacks could lead the nation by becoming energy independent in 20 years.
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Full Citation: Jenkins, J. 2010. Climate change in the Adirondacks: The path to sustainability. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY, published in association with the Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
Author(s): Zack, S., K. Ellison, M. S. Cross, and E. Rowland
Year: 2011
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Zack, S., K. Ellison, M. S. Cross, and E. Rowland. 2010. Climate change planning for the Great Plains: Wildlife vulnerability assessment & recommendations for land and grazing management. Workshop Summary Report. Wildlife Conservation Society, Bozeman, MT.
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