WCS Global Initiatives

WCS Climate Change Resources

Publications and Other Resources

Read publications and other documents about Climate Change by WCS scientists and partners.

Field Select if Search Term
Combination
Author(s): Zack, S., and J. R. Liebezeit
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: Climate change is transforming Arctic Alaska and is impacting spectacular wildlife populations there. This region is renowned for its polar bear, muskox, vast herds of barren ground caribou, and the millions of migratory birds that come from around the globe to breed on the Arctic coastal plain. Projections for the near future indicate that the Arctic is changing dramatically due to the cascading effects from steadily increasing temperatures. What such profound changes mean for wildlife conservation is not clear.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Zack, S., and J. R. Liebezeit. 2010. New Conservation Priorities in a Changing Arctic Alaska. A workshop summary report. Wildlife Conservation Society, Portland, OR.
Author(s): Cross, M. S., and C. Servheen
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: Summary of workshop held September 13-15, 2010 in Fernie, British Columbia, sponsored by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Servheen, C., and M. S. Cross. 2010. Climate change impacts on grizzly bears and wolverines in Northern US and Transboundary Rockies: Strategies for Conservation. Report on a workshop held September 13-15, 2010 in Fernie, British Columbia.
Author(s): Cross, M. S., and C. Servheen
Year: 2009
Description/Abstract: Summary of workshop held October 6-7, 2009, sponsored by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Servheen, C., and M. S. Cross. 2010. Climate change impacts on grizzly bears and wolverines in Northern US and Transboundary Rockies: Strategies for Conservation. Report on a workshop held September 13-15, 2010 in Fernie, British Columbia.
Author(s): Zack, S., K. Ellison, M. S. Cross, and E. Rowland
Year: 2011
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Zack, S., K. Ellison, M. S. Cross, and E. Rowland. 2010. Climate change planning for the Great Plains: Wildlife vulnerability assessment & recommendations for land and grazing management. Workshop Summary Report. Wildlife Conservation Society, Bozeman, MT.
Author(s): Smith, Z., M. Glennon, E. Rowland, and M. S. Cross
Year: 2011
Description/Abstract: On November 17-18, 2010, twenty-five stakeholders from multiple agencies, organizations, and academic institutions (Appendix A) gathered for a workshop hosted by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in Blue Mountain Lake, NY to initiate planning for the potential impacts of climate change on the lowland boreal wetlands of the Adirondack region. . WCS pre-selected the lowland boreal as a conservation target for this workshop because WCS has been monitoring and documenting changes in the boreal wetland ecosystem of the Adirondacks for decades. This report summarizes the workshop.
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society
Full Citation: Smith, Z., M. Glennon, E. Rowland, and M. S. Cross. 2011. Conservation planning for climate change impacts to lowland boreal wetlands in the Adirondack Park, NY. November 17-18, 2010. Workshop Summary Report. Wildlife Conservation Society, Saranac Lake, NY.
Author(s): Seimon, A., J. Watson, R. Dave, J. Oglethorpe and E. Gray
Year: 2011
Publisher: Wildlife Conservation Society and Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group
Full Citation: Seimon, A., J. Watson, R. Dave, J. Oglethorpe and E. Gray (2011): A Review of Climate Change Adaptation Initiatives within the Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group Members. Wildlife Conservation Society, New York, and Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group, Washington DC. 124 pp.
Author(s): Wildlife Conservation Society
Year: 2013
Description/Abstract: In 2001, the Government of Madagascar, in collaboration with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), created the 372,470-hectare Makira Forest Protected Area. The Makira REDD+ Project sells carbon credits generated from avoiding deforestation in order to finance the long-term conservation of this pristine rainforest system, containing rare and threatened biodiversity, improve community land stewardship and governance, and support sustainable livelihood practices for local people. This informational package provides a overview of the project.
Author(s): Wildlife Conservation Society
Year: 2013
Description/Abstract: In 2001, the Government of Madagascar, in collaboration with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), created the 372,470-hectare Makira Forest Protected Area. The Makira REDD+ Project sells carbon credits generated from avoiding deforestation in order to finance the long-term conservation of this pristine rainforest system, containing rare and threatened biodiversity, improve community land stewardship and governance, and support sustainable livelihood practices for local people. This brief provides a short summary of the project.
Author(s): Pacifici, Michela, Foden, Wendy B., Visconti, Piero, Watson, James E. M. , Butchart, Stuart H.M., Kovacs, Kit M., Scheffers, Brett R., Hole, David G., Martin, Tara G., Akcakaya, H. Resit, Corlett, Richard T., Huntley, Brian, Bickford, David, Carr, Jamie A., Hoffmann, Ary A., Midgley, Guy F., Pearce-Kelly, Paul, Pearson, Richard G., Williams, Stephen E., Willis, Stephen G., Young, Bruce, and Rondinini, Carlo
Year: 2015
Description/Abstract: The effects of climate change on biodiversity are increasingly well documented, and many methods have been developed to assess species' vulnerability to climatic changes, both ongoing and projected in the coming decades. To minimize global biodiversity losses, conservationists need to identify those species that are likely to be most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. In this Review, we summarize different currencies used for assessing species' climate change vulnerability. We describe three main approaches used to derive these currencies (correlative, mechanistic and trait-based), and their associated data requirements, spatial and temporal scales of application and modelling methods. We identify strengths and weaknesses of the approaches and highlight the sources of uncertainty inherent in each method that limit projection reliability. Finally, we provide guidance for conservation practitioners in selecting the most appropriate approach(es) for their planning needs and highlight priority areas for further assessments.
Journal/Source: Nature Climate Change
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Full Citation: Pacifici, Michela, Foden, Wendy B., Visconti, Piero, Watson, James E. M. , Butchart, Stuart H.M., Kovacs, Kit M., Scheffers, Brett R., Hole, David G., Martin, Tara G., Akcakaya, H. Resit, Corlett, Richard T., Huntley, Brian, Bickford, David, Carr, Jamie A., Hoffmann, Ary A., Midgley, Guy F., Pearce-Kelly, Paul, Pearson, Richard G., Williams, Stephen E., Willis, Stephen G., Young, Bruce, and Rondinini, Carlo(2014). “Assessing species vulnerability to climate change.” Nature Climate Change 5(3): 215–224. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2448
Author(s): Chapman, S., Mustin, K., Renwick, A.R., Segan, D.B., Hole, D.G., Pearson, R.G. & Watson, J.E.M.
Year: 2014
Description/Abstract: Over the past twelve years the number of papers that explore the impacts of climate change on biodiversity in the conservation literature has grown on average by 20% annually. By categorising these papers on their primary research questions, we show that the vast majority of these articles (88.6%) focus only on those impacts that arise directly as a result of climate change, ignoring the potentially significant indirect threats that arise from human adaptation responses. This pattern has remained fairly consistent throughout the review period (2000–2012), with a trend towards more articles considering both direct and indirect impacts towards the end of the period. We also find a bias in the time-frames considered by published articles that project future impacts of climate change on biodiversity, with more than three-quarters (77.9%) of papers only considering impacts after 2031, and almost half (49.1%) only considering impacts after 2051. This focus on long-term, direct impacts creates a mismatch, not only with the life-cycles of species and timescales of many ecological processes, but also with most management and policy timelines and the short-term nature of human decision making processes. The focus on studying the long-term, direct impacts of climate change on biodiversity is likely a function of the lack of availability of climate projections on shorter temporal scales; a perception that short-term impacts will be minor; and, insufficient integration with the social and political sciences. While the direct impact of changes in mean climatic conditions will significantly change the biosphere by the end of the century, near term changes in seasonality and extreme events coupled with human adaptation responses are likely to have substantial impacts much sooner, threatening the survival of species and ecosystems. It is therefore essential that we balance our research efforts to facilitate a better understanding of these more imminent threats.
Journal/Source: Diversity and Distributions
Full Citation: Chapman, S., Mustin, K., Renwick, A. R., Segan, D. B., Hole, D. G., Pearson, R. G., Watson, J. E. M. (2014), Publishing trends on climate change vulnerability in the conservation literature reveal a predominant focus on direct impacts and long time-scales. Diversity and Distributions, 20: 1221–1228. doi: 10.1111/ddi.12234
Author(s): Mackey, B., DellaSala, D. A., Kormos, C., Lindenmayer, D., Kumpel, N., Zimmerman, B., Hugh, S., Young, V., Foley, S., Arsenis, K. and Watson, J. E.M.
Year: 2014
Description/Abstract: We identify policies that would provide a solid foundation in key international negotiations to ensure that primary forests persist into the 21st Century. A novel compilation of primary forest cover and other data revealed that protection of primary forests is a matter of global concern being equally distributed between developed and developing countries. Almost all (98%) of primary forest is found within 25 countries with around half in five developed ones (USA, Canada, Russia, Australia, and NZ). Only ∼22% of primary forest is found in IUCN Protected Areas Categories I–VI, which is approximately 5% of preagriculture natural forest cover. Rates of deforestation and forest degradation are rapid and extensive, and the long-term integrity of primary forest cannot be assumed. We recommend four new actions that could be included in climate change, biodiversity, and sustainable development negotiations: (1) recognize primary forests as a matter of global concern within international negotiations; (2) incorporate primary forests into environmental accounting; (3) prioritize the principle of avoided loss; and (4) universally accept the important role of indigenous and community conserved areas. In the absence of specific policies for primary forest protection, their unique biodiversity values and ecosystem services will continue to erode.
Journal/Source: Conservation Letters
Full Citation: Mackey, B., DellaSala, D. A., Kormos, C., Lindenmayer, D., Kumpel, N., Zimmerman, B., Hugh, S., Young, V., Foley, S., Arsenis, K. and Watson, J. E.M. (2014), Policy Options for the World's Primary Forests in Multilateral Environmental Agreements. Conservation Letters. doi: 10.1111/conl.12120
Author(s): Watson, J. E. M.
Year: 2013
Journal/Source: Conservation Letters
Full Citation: Watson, J. E. M. (2014). "Human Responses to Climate Change will Seriously Impact Biodiversity Conservation: It's Time We Start Planning for Them." Conservation Letters 7(1): 1-2. doi:10.1111/conl.12083
Author(s): Jane Carter Ingram , Todd Stevens , Tom Clements , Matthew Hatchwell , Linda Krueger , Ray Victurine , Christopher Holmes , David Wilkie
Year: 2009
Description/Abstract: Guide on designing REDD projects. This document draws upon informati on presented at a REDD workshop hosted by the TransLinks program of the Wildlife Conservati on Society in Lima, Peru, September 10-12, 2008.
Publisher: TransLinks
Author(s): Jenkins, J
Year: 2010
Description/Abstract: This full-length book addresses the local implications of climate change, shifting the focus within this global issue to the tangible, the real, and the "solvable." Through text, illustrations, photographs, and diagrams, it tells the story of regional impacts already experienced and likely under climate change. In the second part, the book goes on to deliver a critical message: using existing techniques and technology, the Adirondacks could lead the nation by becoming energy independent in 20 years.
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Full Citation: Jenkins, J. 2010. Climate change in the Adirondacks: The path to sustainability. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY, published in association with the Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.
Author(s): Rao, M., S. Htun, S. G. Platt, R. Tizard, C. Poole, T. Myint and J. E. M. Watson
Year: 2013
Description/Abstract: High levels of species richness and endemism make Myanmar a regional priority for conservation. However, decades of economic and political sanctions have resulted in low conservation investment to effectively tackle threats to biodiversity. Recent sweeping political reforms have placed Myanmar on the fast track to economic development—the expectation is increased economic investments focused on the exploitation of the country’s rich, and relatively intact, natural resources. Within a context of weak regulatory capacity and inadequate environmental safeguards, rapid economic development is likely to have far-reaching negative implications for already threatened biodiversity and natural-resource-dependent human communities. Climate change will further exacerbate prevailing threats given Myanmar’s high exposure and vulnerability. The aim of this review is to examine the implications of increased economic growth and a changing climate within the larger context of biodiversity conservation in Myanmar. We summarize conservation challenges, assess direct climatological impacts on biodiversity and conclude with recommendations for long-term adaptation approaches for biodiversity conservation.
Journal/Source: AMBIO A Journal of the Human Environment
Publisher: Springer Netherlands
Full Citation: Rao, M., S. Htun, S. G. Platt, R. Tizard, C. Poole, T. Myint and J. E. M. Watson (2013). "Biodiversity conservation in a changing climate: A review of threats and implications for conservation planning in Myanmar." AMBIO A Journal of the Human Environment 42(7): 789-804. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13280-013-0423-5
Page 1 of 3 First    Previous    [1]    2    3    Next    Last   

Email from:
 
Email to:
 
Message:


The person you email to will see the details you enter in the Form field and will be given you IP address for auditing purposes